Amy Matto

THE STYLE REPORT

Amy Matto What do Halle Berry, Cindy Crawford, Sharon Stone, and Bethenny Frankel all have in common? They all wear Amy Matto’s versatile yet stylish dresses. “Women today are so busy,” the designer acknowledges. “We need one wardrobe that works for everything. That’s where my collection comes in – perfect dresses that can take you from day to play.” Matto’s dresses are produced entirely in New York City’s Garment District, and range from about $200 to $600. Her Fall collection was inspired by 1960s fashions. “I was looking at photographs of my mother from the early- to mid-1960s. She would go out to supper clubs, with her hair meticulously done, in fabulous outfits. They inspired me to translate that feeling of glamour for today’s woman.” AmyMatto.com

By: Laura Camerlengo

Craving Color?

Inject color into your closet with CHROMATICgallerieshoes. This collection of brightly hued round-toe pumps was inspired by founder Chris Luhur’s quest for vibrant yet comfortable shoes that complemented her style. CHROMATICgallerie offers an array of timeless leather and suede pumps in yummy colors like Pumpkin It Up, Eggplant A Kiss, No Time To Wine, and Lemon Meringue. The shoes come in three different heel heights and widths, with padded insoles for extra comfort – ideal for a BELLA girl on the go.

Available for $88 each at CHROMATICgallerie.com

Now through January 1st get $10 off your CHROMATICgallerie purchase with code BellaNYC at checkout.


Bundle Up!

Want your fur to last for years to come? Follow these “Dos” and “Don’ts” from Schultz Furrier of Millburn, NJ (SchultzFurrier.com):

DO

  • DO keep fur garments in cold storage when you are done wearing them for the season to keep them from drying out, oxidizing, and prematurely aging. A reputable furrier is equipped with temperature, humidity, and light-controlled storage facilities to protect your furs.
  • DO have your fur cleaned and glazed annually by a qualified furrier. Your fur may not look dirty, but removing small, abrasive dirt particles will keep it soft.
  • DO have small rips or tears repaired immediately to prevent more expensive repairs later.
  • DO hang your fur on a supportive, broad-shoulder hanger (avoid using wire hangers). 
  • DO leave enough space in your closet so that your fur is not crushed.
  • DO re-work your fur. One of the beauties of fur is that is can be repaired or remodeled.  A good furrier can match fur and make any repair – or they can help remodel it into fresh, new fashion. 

DON’T

  • DON’T hang your fur in plastic, rubber-lined or cloth bags, as these prevent air from circulating, which can dry out the leather, and cause wear and broken hairs over time.
  • DON’T store your fur in a cedar closet. Cedar wood absorbs moisture, which can dry your fur out, and cedar closets do not protect from dust, dirt, and insect damage.
  • DON’T store your fur with mothballs. Mothballs react with moisture in the air to produce a gas that acts as a fumigant. This chemical reaction can cause irreparable damage to your fur (not to mention leave a lingering odor).
  • DON’T spray perfume, hairspray or other chemicals on your fur. The alcohol content in these products will dry the leather and stiffen the guard hairs.
  • If your fur gets wet, DON’T use direct heat or radiators to dry it, as these can damage both fur and leather. DO shake it out and hang it to dry in a well-ventilated room. If your fur is soaked, take it to a qualified furrier for proper treatment.

Made in New York

You don’t have to go far to find great fashion. Shop sophisticated styles from New York-based designers Voravit Lapnarongchai and Amy Matto.

Svee

Though his women’s apparel brand SVEE may only be a year old, Voravit Lapnarongchai is no fashion rookie. A graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology, and former design assistant for Michael Kors and head of knitwear for Derek Lam, Lapnarongchai explains, “It was my past experiences that lead me to finally launch SVEE.” This line of luxurious, understated basics includes Italian merino wool and silk cashmere knits and classic blue jeans that have “a sense of longevity that transcends time and trends,” he says. SVEE’s Fall/Winter line was influenced by Aztec patterns and geometric lines, which are visible throughout the collection. “Every piece in my collection evokes an emotional experience and journey,” the designer adds. Prices range from $200 for long-sleeve knitted tee to $695 for a hand crocheted cropped jacket. “Each piece will blend seamlessly with a woman’s existing wardrobe,” says Lapnarongchai. “The clothes add an easy, classic element for a look that is elegant without effort.” 

SVEE-NYC.com

Amy Matto

What do Halle Berry, Cindy Crawford, Sharon Stone, and Bethenny Frankel all have in common? They all wear Amy Matto’s versatile yet stylish dresses. “Women today are so busy,” the designer acknowledges. “We need one wardrobe that works for everything. That’s where my collection comes in – perfect dresses that can take you from day to play.” Matto’s dresses are produced entirely in New York City’s Garment District, and range from about $200 to $600. Her Fall collection was inspired by 1960s fashions. “I was looking at photographs of my mother from the early- to mid-1960s. She would go out to supper clubs, with her hair meticulously done, in fabulous outfits. They inspired me to translate that feeling of glamour for today’s woman.” AmyMatto.com


TV Fashion vs. Real-Life Outfits

Want to look TV ready…everyday? Now you can with these exclusive tips from Emme, supermodel and former host of E!’s “Fashion Emergency,” and stylist Sam Saboura of ABC’s “Extreme Makeover” and TLC’s “Real Simple. Real Life.”

“I’ll jump right in and say that everything – and I mean everything – you see on TV needs to be amplified, be it the set design, the clothing, the accessories, hair styles, makeup, to catch the viewer’s eye,” explains Emme. Emme has made countless TV appearances throughout her career as the leading plus-size supermodel, and acknowledges her on-air beauty look is very different than her everyday style. “When you see me walk off set, my makeup looks caked on, like I am dressed up for Halloween, but not on camera. In real life, I wear a bit of blush, some mascara and that’s it. There’s a dramatic difference between the two.”

But with regard to clothing, many TV-style tips can be applied to real life outfits. As Sam Saboura explains, “Well-tailored clothing is always essential on TV—and usually in real life, too. And since the camera adds weight (and it definitely does), heels are also a must to make you look longer and leaner.” Saboura recommends adding prints and textures – “whether on TV or in real life, they hide a multitude of sins, like bumps and bulges.” It’s also a smooth move to show some skin. “The more covered up you are, the fuller you look on camera. This goes for real life, too. I always encourage my clients to show skin in three places for a longer, leaner look: at the neckline (with v-necks and scooped necks), at the arm (with three-quarter sleeves), and at the hemline (with knee-length skirts).” And whether on-screen or on the street, if you want to take years off your appearance, add some color to your closet. “Color makes everyone look more youthful.”

Style Showdown

Ever wonder if a character’s on-screen outfit would work in real life? Sam and Emme weigh-in on these eye-catching styles from today’s top shows.

“Glee” – Quinn Fabray (Dianna Agron)

EMME: “Don’t try this at home! On TV it’s fun and over the top. In reality, you should choose one animal item for your look and keep everything else either one color or muted. All these pieces separately are great. Just choose one and leave the rest.”

SS: “While I love a print – animal especially – this is totally overwhelming and meant to make a statement for the show’s sake. For real life, chose one part of your outfit to make a statement with print.”

“Bones” – Temperance Brennan (Emily Deschanel)

EMME: “Temperance Brennan is one stylish TV forensic anthropologist in her tone-on-tone trench and collared button down. That said, this is a look that can work ina real-life office with a comfortable flat front pant and pumps or a pencil skirt – no need to hide those legs!”

SS: “I like the choice of navy versus black, which allows you to see the detail in the jacket. On camera, a pop of color is always best somewhere, so this lavender shirt works great to brighten up the face and frame it. The self-belt is great to highlight the waist, but I question all the pocketing and details that seem to add bulk to the actress’s frame. I like to keep things more streamlined especially for three-quarter shots like this.”

“The View” – Jaime Lee Curtis

EMME: “Jaime Lee Curtis probably didn’t bring another dress with her; the color of her dress closely matches the couch, so they threw on a scarf at her waist to break it up. Otherwise her outfit would have looked odd to the viewer. In everyday life, I’d advise you not to wear this scarf around your waist this way, but it’s serving a necessary purpose here.”

SS: “Sitting is always a challenge on camera because it immediately bulks up your midsection. Fitted dresses work well to streamline the body and hold in any bumps and bulges. Many hosts who often end up seated on their show will opt for a darker color at the tummy or on lower body to conceal the midsection and hide any flaws on their hips and thighs. Showing skin at the arms, neckline and hem make you look longer and leaner as well.”

“The Voice” – Christina Aguilera

EMME: “These outfits work well on TV and for everyday life as well. Really, they’re keeping with the show’s title. There’s no glam, no shine, but the outfits are a great neutral pair. They look like could have come from a discount department store, like Century 21.”

SS:“We often use color on camera to tell the story of the character. This comes from the old days of costuming for theatre and old melodramas in film. White meant innocence and purity, and black was usually reserved for darker characters and the villain. Here’s a great example of sweet and saucy characters played out in their wardrobe for TV. The belts are also a great option to highlight the waistline, and there’s a lot of subtle texture in these wardrobe choices. You’ll notice cream is used instead of bright white, which is done to avoid a blown-out look from the harsh TV lighting. It’s also a monochromatic look right down to the purse, which keeps the actresses looking long and lean.”